New Website!


For anyone following this blog specifically for the mental health content, I have moved all that stuff (and more!) to my new site Holding Space I’m excited to have a new platform specifically for (what tends to be more personal) Mental Health content that I can separate from my “professional” writing portfolio and more academic work.

I’ll still be putting the same amount of effort and research into my posts. They’ll just be in a place to which potential employers won’t be immediately directed as I look for a job. Because of the personal nature of some of the information I share, and the stigma surrounding mental health, I think the best thing for me to do right now is to separate my information into two different outlets.

I think this separation is actually something that will motivate me to post more often in both places. So, if you’re here for health and wellness information and my personal health journey, head over to Holding Space and click “Follow!”


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The Good and Bad of Watching The Keepers as a Sexual Assault Survivor

Warning: This post discusses sexual assault and suicidal ideation, and may be triggering. If you need support, call RAINN/National Sexual Assault Hotline: 1-800-656-4673, reach out to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255, or text “Start” to 741741 to reach the anonymous Crisis Text Line.

Released in May 2017, the Emmy-nominated Netflix documentary series The Keepers examines the decades-old unsolved murder of beloved Catholic School Teacher Sister Cathy Cesnick in Baltimore. The series connects the nun’s disappearance and murder to the claims of sexual abuse filed against the then-chaplain of Archbishop Keogh High School by former-students in the 1990’s. Through interviews and conversations with former Keogh students, The Keepers pieces together the story of Sister Cathy, the dark testimonies of mistreatment by chaplain Father Maskell, and the ways in which the cases may have been mishandled by Baltimore police or repressed by the Catholic Church.

As a lover of true-crime, I was very excited for the series’ release, but as a sexual assault survivor, I was afraid to watch it. My abusers were not members of the clergy, but any stories or images of sexual abuse can trigger me and send me into a state of hypervigilance and panic. Fueled by curiosity and perhaps a bit of masochism, I turned it on, against my better judgment. The first episode of The Keepers is harmless enough (as far as brutal, unsolved murders go), so I decided to continue, naively unaware of the truly horrifying narrative ahead. Continue reading

What I Want to Tell My Friends About My Recent Social Isolation

Photo from Pexels

Lately, I’ve been feeling very guilty. I wish I didn’t feel that way. I wish I could easily tell myself that I’m taking care of me, and that I’m not responsible for how other people feel, or what other people are doing, or how other people react to me. But I can’t. Not yet, anyway. I’m working on my ability to separate my own feelings from others’, and as someone who has internalized others’ feelings my entire life, it isn’t an easy process. Continue reading


Automatic Thoughts and the Song Stuck in Your Head

Warning: This post discusses suicidal ideation, and may be triggering. If you need support, reach out to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255, or text “Start” to 741741 to reach the anonymous Crisis Text Line.

I want to die.

This is a thought that plays over and over in my head, endlessly, without prompting or any feasible substance behind it. I want to die. I want to die. To die. Die. And I have no real reason for this. I have no evidence as to why I should die, or any idea of why this desire is so strong. I can’t say, “I want to die because…[fill in the blank].” There is no blank. There is nothing. But it’s there, all the same. The words, like a tape on loop, playing until I can’t stand to hear them anymore. I want to die. I want to die. I want to die. Continue reading